Fire Department

Contact

Abdul Ahmad
Fire Chief

phone  951.486.6780
email  Send email...

Fighting fire

The Moreno Valley Fire Department is the primary response agency for fires, emergency medical service, hazardous materials incidents, traffic accidents, terrorist acts, catastrophic weather events, and technical rescues for the City of Moreno Valley.  The Fire Department also provides a full range of fire prevention services including public education, code enforcement, plan check and inspection services for new and existing construction, and fire investigation.  Additionally, the City’s Office of Emergency Management is located within the Fire Department allowing for a well-coordinated response to both natural and man-made disasters. The Moreno Valley Fire Department is part of the CALFIRE / Riverside County Fire Department’s regional, integrated, cooperative fire protection organization.

Divisions and Programs

Select a tab below for more information about Fire Department divisions and programs...

Fire Administration

Smith Ahmad Lanzas

The Administrative Section is responsible for the oversight and management of all Fire Department administrative functions including, but not limited to: Fire Station administration, personnel management and budget administration. The Fire Department Administration also oversees the Fire Prevention Bureau and Office of Emergency Management.

Fire Administration is responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fire Department.  Headed by Fire Chief Abdul Ahmad, Fire Administration provides policy direction, leadership and vision to our members, and plays a key role in securing the resources necessary to carry out our Department mission.  Fiscal management and special projects are under the purview of Fire Administration.

Moreno Valley Fire Services Administrative Offices are located at Moreno Valley’s Public Safety Building:

22850 Calle San Juan De Los Lagos
Moreno Valley, CA 92552
951.486.6780
MVFD@moval.org

Hours of Operation:
Monday-Thursday: 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Friday: Closed

Fire Operations

Fire Operations

The Moreno Valley Fire Department is part of the CAL FIRE/ Riverside County Fire Department’s regionalized, integrated, cooperative fire protection organization. Through this contract relationship with CAL FIRE, and the Riverside County Fire Department, the Moreno Valley Fire Department has the benefits of and access to:

  • Hazardous materials response team
  • Fire arson investigation
  • Fire hand crews, bulldozers, and aircraft
  • Public information and education
  • Consolidated dispatch center for emergency medical and fire dispatch
  • Assistance from the Riverside County Fire Office of Emergency Services

Click here for the Moreno Valley Fire Station locations...

Request a Fire Report

Firefighters

Recovering from a fire can be a physically and mentally draining process.  When fire strikes, lives are suddenly turned around.  Often, the hardest part is knowing where to begin and who to contact.  If you are insured, you will want to notify your insurance company as soon as possible.  If you are in need of temporary housing, food, or medicines, you may wish to contact the local Red Cross at  951.656.4218.  You will also want to contact the City’s Building & Safety Division at  951.413.3350 to obtain assistance with restoring utilities to your property, identifying any construction permits you may need to repair your building and other information that may be helpful to you and your insurance company in recovering from this incident. 

To obtain a copy of your fire report,  you will need to submit a report in writing to the CAL FIRE/Riverside County Fire Department. Please fill out the Incident Report or provide the following information in a written request:

  • Fire date
  • Approximate time of the fire
  • Address or location of the fire

A fire report fee of $15.00 must accompany the request. Fees must be in the form of check or money order payable to Riverside County Fire Department.

Please send the request and fees to:

 Riverside County Fire Department
 Attn: Records
 210 West San Jacinto Avenue
 Perris CA 92570

Normally, the fire report copy will be sent within two weeks.  If you have any questions about a pending report request, call 951.943.4970.  You may also visit the Riverside County website at www.rvcfire.org.

Burn Permits

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During certain times of the year residential landscape debris burning of dead vegetation is allowed. However, homeowners should always check with their local  fire station and South Coast Air Quality Management District before burning.  You may visit the South Coast Air Quality Management District’s website at http://www.aqmd.gov/ for information on whether or not air quality conditions permit burning.  Additionally, you will need to obtain a burn permit from your local fire station.  Please visit our Fire Station Locations page to locate a fire station near you.

The following are burning permit requirements:

  • Maximum pile size 4 foot in diameter.
  • Clear all flammable material and vegetation within 10-feet of the outer edge of pile.
  • Keep a water supply close to the burning site.
  • An adult should be in attendance with a shovel until the fire is out.
  • No burning shall be undertaken unless weather conditions (particularly wind) are such that burning can be considered safe. No household trash or garbage can be burned outdoors at residences.

Dry, natural vegetation, grown on the property can still be burned outdoors in open piles, unless prohibited by local ordinances. Burning can only be done on permissive burn days. Burn permits are only valid on “Permissive Burn Days” as determined by the State Air Resources Board or the South Coast Air Quality Management District.

Fire News - July 2016

Fireworks Illegal in Riverside County - Leave Fireworks to the Professionals

CAL FIRE/Riverside County Fire Chief John Hawkins would like to remind all citizens that Riverside County Ordinances 858 and 757 prohibit the use of any type of fireworks in Riverside County, including sparklers. CAL FIRE/Riverside County Fire Department and law enforcement agencies throughout the County are enforcing zero tolerance for illegal fireworks; and they will be confiscated. Persons who are caught with illegal fireworks are subject to arrest, citation, and/or fines. Find out more...

The Moreno Valley Fire Department Offers the Following Tips for Staying Safe in Pools and Spas:

The Moreno Valley Fire Department experiences several preventable near drowning and drowning incidents each year.   These preventable events can cause severe injuries and may lead to death.  In 2015, there were 47 non-fatal submersions and 19 fatal drowning’s in Riverside County.  Of those incidents, 5 non-fatal submersions and 3 fatal drowning’s occurred within the City of Moreno Valley.

The Moreno Valley Fire Department is asking for your help in preventing drowning with the following water safety tips:

Staying Close, Being Alert and Watching Children in and around the Pool

  • Always watch your children when they are in or near a pool or spa
  • Teach children basic water safety tips
  • Keep children away from pool drains, pipes, and other openings to avoid entrapments
  • Have a portable telephone close by at all time when you and your family are using a pool or spa
  • If a child is missing, look for him or her in the pool or spa first
  • Share safety instructions with family, friends and neighbors

Learning and Practicing Water Safety Skills

  • Lean how to swim and teach your child how to swim
  • Learn to perform CPR on children and adults, and update those skills regularly
  • Understand the basics of life-saving so that you can assist in a pool emergency

Having the Appropriate Equipment for Your Pool or Spa

  • Install a four-foot fence around the pool and spa and use self-closing and self-latching gates; ask your neighbors to do the same at their pools
  • Install and use a lockable safety cover on your spa
  • If your house serves a fourth side of a fence around a pool, install door alarms and always use them
  • For additional protection, install windows guards on windows facing pools or spas
  • Install pool and gate alarms to alert you when children go near the water
  • Ensure any pool and spa you use has compliant drain covers, and ask your pool service provider if you do not know
  • Maintain pool and spa covers in good working order
  • Consider using a surface wave or underwater alarm

For more information please visit http://www.poolsafely.gov/pool-spa-safety/staying-safe-pools-spas/residential-swimming-pools/.

The Moreno Valley Fire Department would like to offer important flood preparedness information:

Summer thunderstorms

Southern California summer thunderstorms occur primarily over the mountains in the south and east and generally receive more storm activity than those ranges in the north and west.

Thunderstorm weather typically begins in early July and tapers off gradually through August and into September; usually there are alternating periods of high and low thunderstorm activity during the season.

Compounding the situation, these sudden and extreme thunderstorms carry the potential of flash floods.

What are flash floods?

Flash floods are the most dangerous type of floods and combine destructive power of a flood with sudden and unexpected speed. These events typically occur suddenly within 2-hours of the start of high intensity rainfall. Most damage and fatalities tend to occur in densely populated areas immediately near a stream, creek, river or flood prone areas and intersections. In addition, heavy rain falling on steep terrain can weaken soil and cause mud slides, damaging homes, roads and property. Flash floods occur when slow moving or multiple thunderstorms happen over the same area. When storms move faster, flash flooding is less likely since the rain is distributed over a larger area.

When a flash flood WATCH is issued

  • Watch for signs of flash flooding and be ready to evacuate on a moment’s notice.

When a flash flood WARNING is issued

  • A flash flood warning is issued when the threat of a flash flood is imminent or occurring.
  • Be ready to evacuate immediately as you may have only seconds to escape.
  • Move to higher ground and away from rivers, streams, creeks and storm drains. Do not drive around barricades. These are placed to keep you out of harm’s way.
  • If your car stalls in rapidly rising waters, abandon it immediately and climb to higher ground.

The Moreno Valley Fire Department would like to offer the following information regarding the Zika virus:

Zika: The basics of the virus and how to protect against it

About Zika

Zika virus spreads to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito (Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus). People can also get Zika through sex with a man infected with Zika and it can be spread from a pregnant woman to her fetus. People can protect themselves from mosquito bites and getting Zika through sex. The information below explains who’s most affected and why, symptoms and treatment, and how to protect against Zika.

How Zika spreads

The mosquitoes that carry Zika are aggressive daytime biters, but they can also bite at night. A mosquito becomes infected when it bites a person already infected with Zika. That mosquito can then spread the virus by biting more people.
Zika virus can also spread:

  • During sex with a man infected with Zika.
  • From a pregnant woman to her fetus during pregnancy or around the time of birth.
  • Through blood transfusion (likely but not confirmed).

Zika symptoms

Many people infected with Zika won’t have symptoms or will only have mild symptoms. The most common symptoms are fever, rash, joint pain, or red eyes. Other common symptoms include muscle pain and headache. Symptoms can last for several days to a week. People usually don’t get sick enough to go to the hospital, and they very rarely die of Zika. Once a person has been infected with Zika, they are likely to be protected from future infections.

Why Zika is risky for some people

Zika infection during pregnancy can cause fetuses to have a birth defect of the brain called microcephaly. Other problems have been detected among fetuses and infants infected with Zika virus before birth, such as defects of the eye, hearing deficits, and impaired growth. There have also been increased reports of Guillain-Barré syndrome, an uncommon sickness of the nervous system, in areas affected by Zika.

How to prevent Zika

There is no vaccine to prevent Zika. The best way to prevent diseases spread by mosquitoes is to protect yourself and your family from mosquito bites. Here’s how:

  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
  • Stay in places with air conditioning and window and door screens to keep mosquitoes outside.
  • Take steps to control mosquitoes inside and outside your home.
  • Treat your clothing and gear with permethrin or buy pre-treated items.

Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents. Always follow the product label instructions. When used as directed, these insect repellents are proven safe and effective even for pregnant and breastfeeding women.

  • Do not use insect repellents on babies younger than 2 months old.
  • Do not use products containing oil of lemon eucalyptus or para-menthane-diol on children younger than 3 years old.
  • Mosquito netting can be used to cover babies younger than 2 months old in carriers, strollers, or cribs to protect them from mosquito bites.
  • Sleep under a mosquito bed net if air conditioned or screened rooms are not available or if sleeping outdoors.
  • Prevent sexual transmission of Zika by using condoms or not having sex.

For more information on the Zika virus, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website.

For more information, please contact the Office of Emergency Management at 951.413.3800.

The Moreno Valley Fire Department would like to offer the following safety tips:

As summer approaches, activities, gatherings and outdoor cooking become a huge family favorite. In order to keep yourself and your family safe the Moreno Valley Fire Department would like to offer the following general barbecue safety tips:

  • Propane and charcoal barbeque grills should only be used outdoors.
  • Place grills away from the home, deck railings and away from eaves or overhanging branches.
  • Do not wear loose clothing and watching for dangling apron strings.
  • Keep children and your pets away from the cooking area.
  • Remember to clean the grill regularly by removing grease or fat buildup from the grill or trays below.
  • Never leave the barbeque unattended.
  • Keep a fire extinguisher within reach.

SafetytTips for propane grills:

  • Check the gas (propane) tank hose for potential gas leaks
    • Start by applying a light soap and water solution to the hose using a brush or spray bottle
    • Turn the propane tank on. If there is a gas leak, the propane will release bubbles around the hose.
    • If there are no bubbles, your grill is safe to use.
    • If there are bubbles, turn off the tank and check connections. Have your grill serviced by a professional before using again.
  • If you smell gas as you’re cooking, turn off the gas tank and burners.
  • If the leak stops, get the grill serviced by a professional before using it again.
  • If the leak continues, move away from the grill and call the fire department immediately. Do not move the grill.

Safety tips for charcoal grills:

  • Never add charcoal fluid or any other flammable liquids to the fire.
  • Keep charcoal fluid out of the reach of children and away from heat sources.
  • For electric charcoal grills, make sure to use an extension cord to keep the grill away from the home.
  • Make sure to let the coals cool completely before disposing of them in a metal container.

For more information please visit: http://www.nfpa.org/public-education/by-topic/outdoors-and-seasonal/grilling/grilling-safety-tips.

Newsletters

Helpful Tips

four firefighters

Staying Safe this Winter

Each year, flooding causes more deaths than from any other severe weather related hazard. The Centers for Disease Control reports that over half of all flood-related drowning’s occur when a vehicle is driven into hazardous flood water. The next highest percentage of flood-related deaths is due to walking into or near flood waters. These are due to the fact that most people underestimate the force and power of water. Here are some excellent tips to keep you safe during storms and possible flooding:

  • Contact your local insurance agent for flood insurance before the storm
  • Check your emergency preparedness kit and update as needed
  • Keep your vehicle fueled in case you need to evacuate
  • Secure outside furniture and other objects that could be caught by wind
  • Keep sandbags handy for emergency waterproofing
  • Monitor weather reports for updated information
  • If flooding is likely, move essential items and furniture to upper floors
  • Limit your travel during storms, stay inside if possible and bring your pets indoors
  • If advised to evacuate, please do so and move to a safe area before your access is cut off by flood water
  • Avoid areas subject to flooding
    Turn Around Don't Drown®
  • Do not try to walk across flowing water as only 6” inches of water can knock over an adult
  • NEVER drive through flooded roadways (road beds may be washed out under flood waters)
    -only 6” of water can cause you to lose control of your car
    -only 12” of water will float most vehicles and 24” of water can sweep your vehicle away
  • If your vehicle stalls, abandon it immediately and seek higher ground

For more tips to keep you safe,
contact Office of Emergency Management at
951.413.3800 or OEM@moval.org

 

 

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Moreno Valley City Hall
14177 Frederick Street
PO Box 88005
Moreno Valley, CA 92552
Phone: 951.413.3000
Hours: Monday - Thursday; 7:30am - 5:30pm
Fridays: 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
E-Mail: webmaster@moval.org
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