Fire Department

Contact

Abdul Ahmad
Fire Chief

phone  951.486.6780
email  Send email...

Fighting fire

The Moreno Valley Fire Department is the primary response agency for fires, emergency medical service, hazardous materials incidents, traffic accidents, terrorist acts, catastrophic weather events, and technical rescues for the City of Moreno Valley.  The Fire Department also provides a full range of fire prevention services including public education, code enforcement, plan check and inspection services for new and existing construction, and fire investigation.  Additionally, the City’s Office of Emergency Management is located within the Fire Department allowing for a well-coordinated response to both natural and man-made disasters. The Moreno Valley Fire Department is part of the CALFIRE / Riverside County Fire Department’s regional, integrated, cooperative fire protection organization.

Divisions and Programs

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Fire Administration

Smith Ahmad Lanzas

The Administrative Section is responsible for the oversight and management of all Fire Department administrative functions including, but not limited to: Fire Station administration, personnel management and budget administration. The Fire Department Administration also oversees the Fire Prevention Bureau and Office of Emergency Management.

Fire Administration is responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fire Department.  Headed by Fire Chief Abdul Ahmad, Fire Administration provides policy direction, leadership and vision to our members, and plays a key role in securing the resources necessary to carry out our Department mission.  Fiscal management and special projects are under the purview of Fire Administration.

Moreno Valley Fire Services Administrative Offices are located at Moreno Valley’s Public Safety Building:

22850 Calle San Juan De Los Lagos
Moreno Valley, CA 92552
951.486.6780
MVFD@moval.org

Hours of Operation:
Monday-Thursday: 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Friday: Closed

Fire Operations

Fire Operations

The Moreno Valley Fire Department is part of the CAL FIRE/ Riverside County Fire Department’s regionalized, integrated, cooperative fire protection organization. Through this contract relationship with CAL FIRE, and the Riverside County Fire Department, the Moreno Valley Fire Department has the benefits of and access to:

  • Hazardous materials response team
  • Fire arson investigation
  • Fire hand crews, bulldozers, and aircraft
  • Public information and education
  • Consolidated dispatch center for emergency medical and fire dispatch
  • Assistance from the Riverside County Fire Office of Emergency Services

Click here for the Moreno Valley Fire Station locations...

Request a Fire Report

Firefighters

Recovering from a fire can be a physically and mentally draining process.  When fire strikes, lives are suddenly turned around.  Often, the hardest part is knowing where to begin and who to contact.  If you are insured, you will want to notify your insurance company as soon as possible.  If you are in need of temporary housing, food, or medicines, you may wish to contact the local Red Cross at  951.656.4218.  You will also want to contact the City’s Building & Safety Division at  951.413.3350 to obtain assistance with restoring utilities to your property, identifying any construction permits you may need to repair your building and other information that may be helpful to you and your insurance company in recovering from this incident. 

To obtain a copy of your fire report,  you will need to submit a report in writing to the CAL FIRE/Riverside County Fire Department. Please fill out the Incident Report or provide the following information in a written request:

  • Fire date
  • Approximate time of the fire
  • Address or location of the fire

A fire report fee of $15.00 must accompany the request. Fees must be in the form of check or money order payable to Riverside County Fire Department.

Please send the request and fees to:

 Riverside County Fire Department
 Attn: Records
 210 West San Jacinto Avenue
 Perris CA 92570

Normally, the fire report copy will be sent within two weeks.  If you have any questions about a pending report request, call 951.943.4970.  You may also visit the Riverside County website at www.rvcfire.org.

Burn Permits

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During certain times of the year residential landscape debris burning of dead vegetation is allowed. However, homeowners should always check with their local  fire station and South Coast Air Quality Management District before burning.  You may visit the South Coast Air Quality Management District’s website at http://www.aqmd.gov/ for information on whether or not air quality conditions permit burning.  Additionally, you will need to obtain a burn permit from your local fire station.  Please visit our Fire Station Locations page to locate a fire station near you.

The following are burning permit requirements:

  • Maximum pile size 4 foot in diameter.
  • Clear all flammable material and vegetation within 10-feet of the outer edge of pile.
  • Keep a water supply close to the burning site.
  • An adult should be in attendance with a shovel until the fire is out.
  • No burning shall be undertaken unless weather conditions (particularly wind) are such that burning can be considered safe. No household trash or garbage can be burned outdoors at residences.

Dry, natural vegetation, grown on the property can still be burned outdoors in open piles, unless prohibited by local ordinances. Burning can only be done on permissive burn days. Burn permits are only valid on “Permissive Burn Days” as determined by the State Air Resources Board or the South Coast Air Quality Management District.

News Release

Acrobat Smoke Alarms Save Lives

Fire News - January 2015

Candle Safety

According to the U.S. Fire Administration, December is the peak time of year for home candle fires. In December, thirteen percent (13%) of home candle fires begin with decorations compared to four percent (4%) the rest of the year. On average, 42 home candle fires are reported every day. More than half of these fires start when something that could burn, such as furniture, mattresses or bedding, curtains, or decorations is too close to candles. Twenty percent (20%) of candle fires start due to unattended or abandoned candles. Falling asleep is a factor in twelve percent (12%) of home candle fires and thirty six percent (36%) of the associated deaths

The Moreno Valley Fire Department Offers the Following Candle Safety Tips:

  • Put candles in sturdy metal, glass or ceramic holders.
  • Consider using battery-operated or electric flameless candles and fragrance warmers, which can look, smell and feel like real candles – without the flame.
  • If you do use candles, ensure they are in sturdy metal, glass or ceramic holders and placed where they cannot be easily knocked down.
  • Avoid using candles in bedrooms and sleeping areas.
  • Extinguish candles after use and before going to bed.
  • Keep candles at least 12 inches from anything that can burn.
  • Keep candles out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Set a good example by using matches, lighters and fire carefully.
  • Children should never be allowed to play with matches, lighters or candles.
  • Never use a candle where medical oxygen is being used. The two can combine to create a large, unexpected fire.
  • Always use a flashlight – not a candle – for emergency lighting.
  • Never put candles on a Christmas tree.
  • When using in home worship, don't place lit candles in windows, where blinds and curtains can close over them, or pass handheld candles from one person to another. To lower the risk of fire, candles should be used by only a few designated adults.
  • And never leave burning candles unattended!

For more information on candle safety tips, please visit: http://www.usfa.fema.gov/citizens/home_fire_prev/candle.shtm.

The Moreno Valley Fire Department Would Like to Remind You about the Importance of Replacing the Batteries on Smoke Detectors

  • One of the best ways to protect yourself and your family is to have a working smoke alarm that can sound fast for both a fire that has flames, and a smoky fire that has fumes without flames. It is called a "Dual Sensor Smoke Alarm."
  • Place a smoke alarm on the ceiling of every level of your home and both inside and outside bedrooms. Children and older people can sleep though the loud sound of a smoke alarm. Make sure your escape plan includes someone that can help children and others wake up immediately to escape from the home.
  • If you keep your bedroom doors closed, place a smoke alarm on the ceiling of each bedroom.
  • Check smoke alarms monthly by pressing the test button.
  • Never take smoke alarm batteries out to put into other items like games or remote controls.
  • Teach children what the smoke alarm sounds like and what to do when they hear the alarm sound.
  • If there is a fire, leave the home right away by crawling low under the smoke and never go back inside.
  • If smoke from cooking makes the alarm sound, press the "hush" button, if your alarm has one. You can also turn on the kitchen fan, open a window or wave a towel near the alarm until it stops making the sound. Never take the battery out of the alarm.
  • Most alarms need a new battery at least once a year. Some smoke alarms have batteries that last for up to 10 years. If your smoke alarm is over 10 years old, replace it with a new alarm and a new battery.
  • If you rent, talk to your landlord about placing a working smoke alarm in your home. You still need to buy a new battery at least once a year for the alarm.

The Moreno Valley Office of Emergency Management Would Like to Offer Important Flood Preparedness Information.

The Office of emergency Management would like to remind everyone floods are one of the most common hazards in Riverside County. They can cause injury, death property damage and even contaminate drinking water and cause electrical disruptions which can severely impact the City of Moreno Valley. All floods are not alike and can develop slowly over time but can also progress very quickly in just a few minutes. Flash floods often have a dangerous wall of rapidly moving water that carries rocks, mud, debris and can sweep away anything in its path. Be aware of flood hazards no matter where you live, but especially if you live in low lying areas, near water or even near flood prone areas or intersections. Do not attempt to cross an area or intersection that appears to be flooded but rather find an alternate route of travel.

Before the Flood Warning or Watch
Be prepared to respond to flooding by taking the following actions before the rains and flooding begin:

  • Assemble emergency supply kits for your home, workplace, and vehicle.
  • Store a seven-day supply of food and water (at least one gallon per person, per day) in closed, clean containers.
  • Sandbags
  • Plastic sheeting
  • Teach children not to play in or near rivers, streams, or other areas of potential flooding.
  • Identify safe routes from your home or work place to high, safe ground. Determine whether you can use these routes during flooding or storms. Be familiar with your geographic surroundings.

During the Flood

  • Avoid unnecessary trips.
  • Do not drive or walk through moving water. You can be knocked off your feet in as little as 6 inches of water.
  • Do not “sightsee” or enter restricted areas.
  • Stay away from streams, rivers, flood control channels and other areas subject to sudden flooding.
  • Move to higher ground if you’re caught by rising waters.
  • Use the phone only to report dangerous conditions or emergencies that are life threatening.

Newsletters

 

 

 

Helpful Tips

four firefighters

Staying Safe this Winter

Each year, flooding causes more deaths than from any other severe weather related hazard. The Centers for Disease Control reports that over half of all flood-related drowning’s occur when a vehicle is driven into hazardous flood water. The next highest percentage of flood-related deaths is due to walking into or near flood waters. These are due to the fact that most people underestimate the force and power of water. Here are some excellent tips to keep you safe during storms and possible flooding:

  • Contact your local insurance agent for flood insurance before the storm
  • Check your emergency preparedness kit and update as needed
  • Keep your vehicle fueled in case you need to evacuate
  • Secure outside furniture and other objects that could be caught by wind
  • Keep sandbags handy for emergency waterproofing
  • Monitor weather reports for updated information
  • If flooding is likely, move essential items and furniture to upper floors
  • Limit your travel during storms, stay inside if possible and bring your pets indoors
  • If advised to evacuate, please do so and move to a safe area before your access is cut off by flood water
  • Avoid areas subject to flooding
    Turn Around Don't Drown®
  • Do not try to walk across flowing water as only 6” inches of water can knock over an adult
  • NEVER drive through flooded roadways (road beds may be washed out under flood waters)
    -only 6” of water can cause you to lose control of your car
    -only 12” of water will float most vehicles and 24” of water can sweep your vehicle away
  • If your vehicle stalls, abandon it immediately and seek higher ground

For more tips to keep you safe,
contact Office of Emergency Management at
951.413.3800 or OEM@moval.org

 

 

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Moreno Valley City Hall
14177 Frederick Street
PO Box 88005
Moreno Valley, CA 92552
Phone: 951.413.3000
Hours: Monday - Thursday; 7:30am - 5:30pm
Fridays: 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
E-Mail: webmaster@moval.org
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